8 Signs of Diabetes in Pets

by VetDepot on April 18, 2014

diabetes blogDiabetes is not just a human health condition, it’s becoming increasingly prevalent in pets. Canine and feline diabetes awareness is important so that owners can spot symptoms early on and treatment can begin. Below are eight signs that a pet is suffering from diabetes:

  1. Increased thirst: If your pet is gulping down more water than usual, this might be an early sign of the disease.
  2. Frequent urination: If your pet is urinating more often or starting to have accidents around the house, it’s time to consult with a veterinarian.
  3. Increased appetite: If your pet is especially ravenous despite eating regularly, this could be a sign of diabetes known as polyphagia.
  4. Weight loss: Despite being especially hungry, pets suffering from diabetes often experience sudden weight loss. Learn more…
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Idog jumping blogt’s fairly common for dogs to jump up on people when they’re excited. This excitement may be cute as a puppy, but as a dog grows bigger, jumping up can become increasingly frustrating for owners. For this reason, it’s best to start discouraging this behavior early on and to remain consistent.

It’s important for pet parents to understand where this behavior stems from. In canine to canine communication, greetings are often exchanged by sniffing each other’s faces, so it’s totally understandable that dogs instinctively try to apply this behavior to their interactions with people. Dogs aren’t purposely misbehaving when they jump up on people, but they do need help understanding what an appropriate greeting consists of. Learn more…

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Recognizing Symptoms of Feline Leukemia (FeLV)

by VetDepot on April 11, 2014

Kitten 9 editedDespite what the name implies, feline leukemia is not always associated with cancer. Feline leukemia is a viral infection in cats that can manifest in almost any organ of the body and severely inhibit the immune system.

It is contagious and can be spread from cat to cat through contact with nasal secretions, feces, urine, and other body fluids. Cats can also become infected during fetal development or contract the infection from their mothers during nursing. The virus does not linger long in the environment, so direct contact is usually necessary for transmission. Learn more…

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Tips for Giving Your Dog Liquid Medication

by VetDepot on April 9, 2014

Pug puppy editedIf your dog has ever been prescribed a liquid medication, you’re probably well aware that administration can be tricky. Below are some tips for making the medicine go down a little easier:

•Use the buddy system: It’s always easier if there are two people present during this process. One person can hold the dog still and provide comfort, while the other can administer the medication.

•Use the proper technique: Insert the tip of the syringe or dropper into the corner of your dog’s mouth between the teeth and the cheek. Be sure to aim the dropper toward your dog’s throat. Learn more…

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5 Challenging Dog Breeds for New Owners

by VetDepot on April 8, 2014

weim blogWith all of the joy and liveliness dogs bring to their families, there’s no doubt that first time dog owners are in for a treat. There are plenty of dog breeds and mixes out there that make wonderful companions for new pet parents, but there are also a few to be cautious of. The following is a list of breeds that have plenty of great traits, but typically do better with experienced owners:

1.) Weimaraner (pictured): Weimaraners are beautiful, highly intelligent dogs. However, they’re very energetic and best suited for active families that spend a great deal of time outdoors. Separation anxiety is common with this breed.

2.) Bullmastiff: Although incredibly loyal and protective, bullmastiffs can present several challenges for new pet parents. They weigh in at 100+ pounds and need an owner who will set firm and consistent boundaries. Learn more…

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Common Veterinary Abbreviations

by VetDepot on April 4, 2014

vet holding cat editedThere are several commonly used abbreviations in the veterinary world. Most of the time, a vet will thoroughly explain any notes or prescription pet medication instructions. However, every once in a while, an unexplained abbreviation might leave a pet owner stumped. Below are a few common veterinary abbreviations. Remember, if you ever have any questions at all about your pet’s condition or medications, it’s always okay to follow up with your vet and ask.

BID: Indicates a medication should be given twice daily. This abbreviation comes from the Latin words bis in die.

TID: Indicates a medication should be given three times daily. Learn more…

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What to Do If Your Dog Is Stung by a Bee

by VetDepot on April 1, 2014

dog smelling grass editedSpring is officially here, which may mean your canine companion is enjoying more time outside! Dogs are curious and playful by nature, which puts them at an increased risk for bee stings when exploring the outdoors.

Signs that your dog may have been stung by a bee include yelping, scratching or licking at the site of the sting, and redness. If your dog is stung, try to remove the stinger as quickly as possible. It’s important to do this with a flat surface like a credit card. Attempting to remove the stinger with your fingers or tweezers will likely expose your dog to more venom. Learn more…

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Why Do Dogs Chase Their Tails?

by VetDepot on March 27, 2014

dog chasing tail black and white blogMost pet parents have witnessed tail chasing at least once. This seemingly silly behavior can be just as entertaining for the owner as it is for the dog, but, why do dogs chase their tails?

Most of the time, dogs chase their tails to expend pent-up energy. They want to play, and chasing their tail is a natural way to fulfill their prey instinct and desire for activity. If you notice this behavior, it may be a good time for a walk or a game of fetch.

In some cases, tail chasing can be a sign of an underlying condition. Dogs suffering from an anal gland problem, dermatitis, or other medical issues may exhibit this behavior. Learn more…

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dog spring time blogBoth dogs and people can suffer from environmental allergies, but despite being associated with many of the same triggers (pollen, molds, dust mites, etc.), there is one key difference.

If you have allergies, you are all too familiar with the sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes that accompany the condition. While some dogs are affected in a similar manner, the most common clinical sign associated with canine allergies is itchiness. Any part of the body may be affected, but the face, feet, and sparsely haired parts of the body are often prime targets. This is because direct contact between the allergen and the skin is what sets off allergic reactions in many dogs, and these are the parts of the body that are most likely to come in contact with allergens.

Since skin to allergen contact plays such an important role in canine allergies, it shouldn’t be too surprising that topical therapy plays a vital role in treating the condition. The simplest form of therapy is bathing. Learn more…

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Six Ways Cats Show Love for Their Owners

by VetDepot on March 25, 2014

cat pet editedCats may be a little more subtle than dogs when it comes to expressing their love, but they certainly have their own ways of showing affection.

Below are six ways cats show love for their human companions:

1.)    Holding eye contact: If your sweet kitty catches your gaze, possibly followed by a soft blink, this is most likely an indication of love and trust.

2.)    Purring: This may be an obvious one, but a steady purr is a sure sign your cat is content in your presence.

3.)    Paw kneading: Purring is often accompanied by paw kneading, and is one way your cat might try to nuzzle up to you.

4.)    Napping on or next to you: Most cats have a large variety of options when it comes to napping locations. Learn more…

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