Is it Healthy for Your Pet to Sleep in Your Bed?

by VetDepot on April 24, 2014

dog sleeping in bed blogMore and more pet owners are choosing to share their beds with their four-legged companions. According to a recent survey, almost half of dog owners and over 60% of cat owners allow their pets to sleep in their beds. Cuddling up to your furry best friend may be common, but is it safe?

The answer depends on the person. People suffering from asthma or certain allergies are probably better off sleeping apart from their pets. In fact, for this particular group of people, pets should probably not be allowed in the bedroom at all.

The other issue sometimes associated with pets in the bed is sleep disruption. Learn more…

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Five of the Most Cuddly Dog Breeds

by VetDepot on April 24, 2014

sweet cavalier blogDogs come in all shapes and sizes. Some love to run, some love to play, and some are content just curling up in a warm lap for a nap. If you’re looking for an especially snuggly canine companion, you might consider one of these five breeds:

1.) Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (pictured right): These happy dogs are people pleasers! They love nothing more than to lounge around with their human companions.

2.) Maltese: Due to their small size, sweet temperament, and fluffy coats, these dogs make wonderful lapdogs. Learn more…

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What to Expect as Your Cat Ages

by VetDepot on April 22, 2014

senior cat blogCats typically reach senior status at around 10 to 12 years old. Although they’re still as lovable as ever, some physical and behavioral changes will likely occur.

Senior cats tend to slow down as they age due to joint pain. They may stop jumping up on furniture or playing with their toys as often. Hearing or vision loss is also a possibility. As a cat progresses into its teen years, dementia becomes more likely as well, which can cause confusion. This may all sound a bit discouraging, but management of these conditions is possible.

Below are some helpful tips for keeping your senior cat healthy and comfortable:

•Pay attention: Subtle changes in behavior can actually be clues about your cat’s health. Learn more…

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small angry dog blogIt’s not uncommon for the littlest of dogs to have the biggest of personalities. If you’re the owner of a dog (big or small), you may have noticed that some small dogs always manage to have an attitude with the biggest dog at the park – but why?

The simplest answer is that small dogs are still dogs. They’re capable of barking, growling, and protecting their space and family from potential threats. If they perceive a large dog as a threat, their doggy instincts are going to kick in, no matter what their size.

Another contributor to the small dog, big attitude phenomenon is that many little dogs are terriers or terrier mixes. Learn more…

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8 Signs of Diabetes in Pets

by VetDepot on April 18, 2014

diabetes blogDiabetes is not just a human health condition, it’s becoming increasingly prevalent in pets. Canine and feline diabetes awareness is important so that owners can spot symptoms early on and treatment can begin. Below are eight signs that a pet is suffering from diabetes:

  1. Increased thirst: If your pet is gulping down more water than usual, this might be an early sign of the disease.
  2. Frequent urination: If your pet is urinating more often or starting to have accidents around the house, it’s time to consult with a veterinarian.
  3. Increased appetite: If your pet is especially ravenous despite eating regularly, this could be a sign of diabetes known as polyphagia.
  4. Weight loss: Despite being especially hungry, pets suffering from diabetes often experience sudden weight loss. Learn more…
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Idog jumping blogt’s fairly common for dogs to jump up on people when they’re excited. This excitement may be cute as a puppy, but as a dog grows bigger, jumping up can become increasingly frustrating for owners. For this reason, it’s best to start discouraging this behavior early on and to remain consistent.

It’s important for pet parents to understand where this behavior stems from. In canine to canine communication, greetings are often exchanged by sniffing each other’s faces, so it’s totally understandable that dogs instinctively try to apply this behavior to their interactions with people. Dogs aren’t purposely misbehaving when they jump up on people, but they do need help understanding what an appropriate greeting consists of. Learn more…

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Recognizing Symptoms of Feline Leukemia (FeLV)

by VetDepot on April 11, 2014

Kitten 9 editedDespite what the name implies, feline leukemia is not always associated with cancer. Feline leukemia is a viral infection in cats that can manifest in almost any organ of the body and severely inhibit the immune system.

It is contagious and can be spread from cat to cat through contact with nasal secretions, feces, urine, and other body fluids. Cats can also become infected during fetal development or contract the infection from their mothers during nursing. The virus does not linger long in the environment, so direct contact is usually necessary for transmission. Learn more…

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Tips for Giving Your Dog Liquid Medication

by VetDepot on April 9, 2014

Pug puppy editedIf your dog has ever been prescribed a liquid medication, you’re probably well aware that administration can be tricky. Below are some tips for making the medicine go down a little easier:

•Use the buddy system: It’s always easier if there are two people present during this process. One person can hold the dog still and provide comfort, while the other can administer the medication.

•Use the proper technique: Insert the tip of the syringe or dropper into the corner of your dog’s mouth between the teeth and the cheek. Be sure to aim the dropper toward your dog’s throat. Learn more…

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5 Challenging Dog Breeds for New Owners

by VetDepot on April 8, 2014

weim blogWith all of the joy and liveliness dogs bring to their families, there’s no doubt that first time dog owners are in for a treat. There are plenty of dog breeds and mixes out there that make wonderful companions for new pet parents, but there are also a few to be cautious of. The following is a list of breeds that have plenty of great traits, but typically do better with experienced owners:

1.) Weimaraner (pictured): Weimaraners are beautiful, highly intelligent dogs. However, they’re very energetic and best suited for active families that spend a great deal of time outdoors. Separation anxiety is common with this breed.

2.) Bullmastiff: Although incredibly loyal and protective, bullmastiffs can present several challenges for new pet parents. They weigh in at 100+ pounds and need an owner who will set firm and consistent boundaries. Learn more…

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Common Veterinary Abbreviations

by VetDepot on April 4, 2014

vet holding cat editedThere are several commonly used abbreviations in the veterinary world. Most of the time, a vet will thoroughly explain any notes or prescription pet medication instructions. However, every once in a while, an unexplained abbreviation might leave a pet owner stumped. Below are a few common veterinary abbreviations. Remember, if you ever have any questions at all about your pet’s condition or medications, it’s always okay to follow up with your vet and ask.

BID: Indicates a medication should be given twice daily. This abbreviation comes from the Latin words bis in die.

TID: Indicates a medication should be given three times daily. Learn more…

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