Dogs Could be First Beneficiaries of New Drug Manufacturing Technology

by VetDepot on December 17, 2012

Recently released research reveals that new technology could cut the cost of manufacturing medications by up to 90 percent, which would provide significant savings to both health insurers and patients. The research was published last week by the San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology at the University of California at San Diego in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Many current leading medications are made in biotechnology plants that grow cells in highly controlled large vat environments that cost hundreds of millions to construct and operate. Advanced medications currently have to be made in the cells of mammals, which have to exist in an extremely sterile environment. The paper proves that using genetically engineered algae environments instead of highly controlled mammalian cell environments would cut costs significantly.

Stephen Mayfield, UC San Diego professor and senior author of the paper, predicts that dogs will be the first beneficiaries of this new technology while it is being proven safe for humans. He believes the first medications will target canine lymphomas and they are currently looking for a veterinary biotechnology company to develop a treatment for animals with their research

Print Friendly
Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Print

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: